RISK IN SPERM AFTER CERTAIN AGE ‘WHY FREEZE SPERM BEFORE 40

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WHY SHOULD MEN FREEZE SPERM BEFORE 40

According to a new study, children are at an increased risk of developing autism and heart disease due to mutations in the sperm of older men. One in 15 men is at risk of having a negative mutation in their child! What does it all mean?

Nowadays, the age of having children is increasing. Instead of being parents at a very young age, women and men are planning babies in later years. Life conditions, work intensity, career planning, the thought of having children after feeling fully ready, such as the age of becoming a parent carries forward.

A new study, on the other hand, has revealed very interesting data about being a father at a late age. According to research, mutations in older men’s sperm can pass on to their children, causing heart disease and autism.

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine found a mutation called mosaicism in the sperm DNA structure of one in every 15 men. It was noted that these sperm mutations can lead to congenital disorders such as heart disease, autism and epilepsy in children, while the risk is higher in older men.

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10-30 PERCENT OF AUTISM CASES ARE CAUSED BY SPERM TRANSMISSION

Despite decades of research, the causes of autism are still not fully known today, with both genetic and environmental factors thought to play a role. However, recent research suggests that a mutation in sperm may be the cause of 10 to 30 percent of autism cases.

Lead author of the study Dr. says that, unlike blood, mosaicism in sperm does not change with age, and adds: “the comparison between older and younger men showed little difference in mutations. In the study, we discovered that these mutations probably arose when the father was an embryo, and that the mutations could remain undetected until the man had children.”

So, in fact, there is a possibility that sperm mutations occur in every man. But these mutations are more likely to cause health problems in children than in older men.

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BIOLOGICAL CLOCK NOT UNIQUE TO WOMEN

Contrary to widespread belief around the world, research shows that men also have a biological clock. The study by the Centre for Reproductive and Genetic Health in London, which analyzed data from 4,300 couples undergoing fertility treatment, found the likelihood of a live birth dropped by a third if the father was over 50.

“As a man you produce sperm all your life, so in theory you could be a father to a child in your 90s. But the problem is that sperm quality starts to drop from your 20s,” says, adding:

“From the age of 30, your testosterone begins to decrease naturally. So men also become less fertile as they get older.”

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MEN THINK THEY ARE LUCKIER THAN WOMEN BUT…

“While couples used to have children in their twenties, the number of couples who choose to have children after the Forties is very high today due to economic difficulties, career concerns, personal preferences,” says, who said that many couples have delayed their dream of becoming parents to an advanced age due to our changing living conditions in recent years.

“It is known to everyone that women’s egg reserves decrease in their forties. Many conscious women begin to rush to have children when they reach their thirties or take precautions by freezing their eggs, ” said Prof. Dr. Although men think that they are more advantageous in terms of reproduction than women and can produce healthy sperm for the rest of their lives, and emphasizes that current studies show that this idea is not very accurate.

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MUTATIONS OCCUR IN ALL OF OUR CELLS EVERY DAY

In the study, we mentioned above that one in every 15 men had mutations called mosaicism in the structure of sperm DNA, and that men with these sperm mutations, which can lead to congenital disorders such as heart disease, autism and epilepsy in children, were older.

“What is a cell mutation called mosaicism? “We all originate from a single cell that begins to develop in the womb, ” said. So the genetic makeup of all our cells is the same. But sometimes, during the proliferation of cells, mutations occur in our genetic structure, and cells with different genetic characteristics are formed in our body. This genetic diversity that occurs in the same body is called mosaicism,” he answers.

“All of us every day minor mutations occur in the cells, but genetically-defective cells or they are destroyed by the immune system, they are destroying themselves,” he says, and adds: “some mutated cells continue to multiply out of control and they lead to diseases such as cancer.”

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A MAN CAN PRODUCE SPERM FOR THE REST OF HIS LIFE

A professor who describes the issue of Sperm mutation in more detail Dr. “Women have a certain number of eggs from the moment they are born and consume these eggs until they enter menopause. Unlike women, in men, sperm precursor cells constantly divide and multiply, and a healthy man can produce sperm for the rest of his life,” he says.

“These mutations are much less common in men who eat healthy, exercise regularly, and are not exposed to radiation and chemicals,” he says.

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FREEZE YOUR SPERM BEFORE YOUR FORTIES

When pregnancy in Turkey is achieved with genetically not healthy sperm produced in the older age, neuro-psychological and cardiovascular diseases are more common in the child to be born.

“Men who want to have children, especially after the forties, are more at risk for sperm mutations,” he said. For this reason, it is recommended that men who want to have children freeze their sperm by contacting an IVF Center in Turkey before the age of Forties, and when they want to have children, they use these frozen healthy sperm.

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President of Organ Transplant Center at MedicalPark Hospital Antalya

Turkey's world-renowned organ transplant specialist. Dr. Demirbaş has 104 international publications and 102 national publications.

Physician's Resume:

Born on August 7, 1963 in Çorum, Prof. Dr. Alper Demirbaş has been continuing his work as the President of MedicalPark Antalya Hospital Organ Transplantation Center since 2008.

Prof. who performed the first tissue incompatible kidney transplant in Turkey, the first blood type incompatible kidney transplant, the first kidney-pancreas transplant program and the first cadaveric donor and live donor liver transplant in Antalya. Dr. As of August 2016, Alper Demirbaş has performed 4900 kidney transplants, 500 liver transplants and 95 pancreas transplants.

In addition to being the chairman of 6 national congresses, he has also been an invited speaker at 12 international and 65 national scientific congresses. Dr. Alper Demirbaş was married and the father of 1 girl and 1 boy.

Awards:

Eczacibasi Medical Award of 2002, Akdeniz University Service Award of 2005, Izder Medical Man of the Year Award of 2006, BÖHAK Medical Man of the Year Award of 2007, Sabah Mediterranean Newspaper Scientist of the Year Award of 2007, ANTIKAD Scientist of the Year Award of 2009, Social Ethics Association Award of 2010, Işık University Medical Man of the Year Award of 2015, VTV Antalya's Brand Value Award of 2015.

Certificates:

Doctor of Medicine Degree Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine Ankara, General Surgeon Ministry of Health Turkey EKFMG (0-477-343-8), University of Miami School of Medicine Member of Multiple Organ Transplant, ASTS Multiorgan Transplant Scholarship. Lecturer at Kyoto University. Lecturer at University of Essen, Research assistant at the University of Cambridge .

Professional Members:

American Society of Transplant Surgeons, American Transplantation Society Nominated, Middle East and Southern Africa Council Transplantation Society 2007, International Liver Transplantation Association, Turkish Transplantation Association, Turkish Society of Surgery, Turkish Hepatobiliary Surgery Association.

Disclaimer:

Our website contents consist of articles approved by our Web and Medical Editorial Board with the contributions of our physicians. Our contents are prepared only for informational purposes for public benefit. Be sure to consult your doctor for diagnosis and treatment.
Medically Reviewed by Professor Doctor Alper Demirbaş
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