IT HAS A VERY SURPRISING EFFECT! PEEL THE BANANA AND BOIL IT 10 MINUTES

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WHAT KIND OF SHELL WORKS

For those who are wondering what kind of food shell works, we also did a little research and here is all you need to know;

Millions of people around the world are trying to survive hunger levels, while tons of food are unfortunately going to the trash every year. According to a report by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), about 14 percent of the food produced in the world is thrown away before it even reaches the consumer. In particular, Central and South Asia and North America and Europe are leading the way in food waste. We investigated the biggest mistakes made for you, especially when storing vegetables and fruits, what you can do to extend the life of products that deteriorate easily if not stored correctly, and how much the stems and shells you throw away as garbage actually work.
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  • One thing you can do, as well as storing vegetables and fruits in the right conditions to prevent food waste, is reduce waste. The most important way to do this is not to get too deep when peeling vegetables and fruits, and even evaluate their shells. For those who are wondering what kind of shell works, we also did a little research. Here’s all you need to know.
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  • If fresh products that you buy from a grocery store or market and bring to your home deteriorate in a short time, the most important reason for this is storage conditions. For example, placing vegetables and fruits in the same drawer or shelf in the refrigerator is a big mistake. Because many fruits release ethylene gas, and the gas also creates a ripening hormone effect on vegetables, causing them to lose their freshness in less time.
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  • Vegetables in particular need breathing. For this reason, you should drill holes in the plastic bags in which you put vegetables, or store vegetables in fishnet bags. Storing them all in a cramped form in a narrow space also leads to a rapid deterioration of the vegetables.
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Finally, washing and storing vegetables and fruits is a huge mistake. Experts stress that you should not wash these products until the time you eat them. Because moisture accelerates bacterial growth. So, what are the products that make the most mistakes when storing them? Here’s the answer…

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1. DRIED ONIONS

Find a clean Women’s sock. Fill the onions on the legs of the sock one by one. Tie knots between each onion and hang them somewhere at room temperature. If you do not like this image, you can also store your onions in an open-mouthed container on the counter. But whatever you do, keep your onions away from the potatoes and don’t put them in the fridge. Humidity and cold air cause the onions to soften. Hiding it in a dark place also prevents the onion from becoming bitter.

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2. GARLIC

You should store the garlic at room temperature in an open-mouthed container to allow air circulation. If you are not going to use it immediately, do not separate the garlic teeth from the beginning and leave them out of the shell. And there is no blame on you if you keep it with the onion.

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3. POTATOES

Keep your potatoes in a dark, cool place but don’t put them in the fridge. In cold and humid conditions, the starch in the potato turns into sugar. This, in turn, affects its flavor and structure. You can store your potatoes in a cool place like a pantry in paper bags. Bringing potatoes side by side with fruits such as onions or apples, which secrete ethylene gas, causes sprouting.

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4. CARROT

First, cut off the green stems if you have them. These parts attract moisture and cause the carrots to soften immediately. Carrots, which have been topped but not peeled, can last up to two weeks in the refrigerator’s vegetable eye in a locked refrigerator bag. Carrots divided into small pieces will last longer if you store them in a container full of water with its mouth tightly closed. Don’t forget to change the water frequently.

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5. CUCUMBER

Cucumbers hate the cold. At temperatures below 10 degrees, they quickly begin to deteriorate. If you need to put cucumbers in the refrigerator, try not to exceed three days of this period. Cucumber is also a vegetable sensitive to ethylene gas, so make sure they stay away from bananas, melons and tomatoes.

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6. TOMATO

Factors such as the type of tomato, the fineness of its crust, can change storage conditions, but in general, keeping ripe tomatoes in the refrigerator for a few days does not cause their flavor to deteriorate, but also prolongs their shelf life. If the tomato is not ripe enough when you take it, leave it on the counter until it is ripe. Then place in a plate with the root parts on the bottom and place in the refrigerator in this state. The fact that the root is at the bottom delays the moisture of this area and prevents it from rotting. It is best to store chopped tomatoes in a closed container that does not breathe. So they don’t attract other smells in the environment. Waiting for them to come to room temperature before serving the tomatoes is also the right move.

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7. BANANA

When you store bananas one by one, rather than in hevenk, you take a step to extend their life. But here it is important to wrap the root of each banana with stretch film. In this way, you can prevent the output of ethylene gas and slow down maturation. When your banana is ripe enough, you can remove it to the fridge. Cold weather will prevent further ripening.

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8. BRUSSELS SPROUTS

They last longer if you hide Brussels sprouts without ripping them off the branch. Even if possible, dip this branch in buya and rip off the cabbage only when you need it. If you have taken it off the branch, then place it in an open-mouth ziplock bag and put it in a vegetable drawer without washing and cutting it. Remove the outer leaves before cooking. Remember, as Brussels sprouts wait, their flavor intensifies.

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9. CELERY STALK

Celery stalk needs to be kept tightly wrapped in aluminum foil to preserve its freshness. Thus, it is possible to prevent the output of the ethylene gas it produces. Remember to close the package thoroughly again after each use. You should bury and store the extracted celery stalks in water, as in carrots.

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10. ASPARAGUS

For asparagus, there are different storage methods, but it is best to cut up to 1 centimeter from the root and sew the stems into a small amount of water like a bouquet, and cover them with a loose nylon bag. Asparagus, which is placed in the refrigerator in this state, can remain fresh for up to four days. But before consuming, it is useful to re-cut the roots a little.

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11. APPLE

Apples can be stored at room temperature, but if you want to have a long life, you should use a vegetable drawer in the refrigerator. In this way, you can extend the ripening time of the Apple and eat your apples with flavor and pleasure for a few weeks.

Let’s move on to the shells… here are the benefits and uses of those shells that you throw in the trash…

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12. ORANGE AND LEMON PEEL

You squeeze the lemon into the salad and throw it in the trash, don’t you? Don’t do it! Instead, you can grate citrus shells and use them as a flavor in many recipes, from cake to tea, from salad to porridge. Because the peel of lemon is actually more nutritious than its fruit. Two spoons of grated lemon peel contains 5 times more vitamin C than its fruit, as well as many useful minerals.

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13. WATERMELON SHELLS AND KERNELS

The shells and seeds of watermelon, the most beautiful fruit of the summer months, are as valuable as its fruit. The thick white part around the fruit contains an amino acid that speeds up your blood circulation and turns into arginine, which strengthens the immune system. It also stores vitamin C and B6. Just as you can make jam with this white part, you can add it to fruit salad, smoothie, soups, pickles.

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14. BROCCOLI ROOTS

The roots of broccoli contain an antioxidant called sulforaphane, which has the ability to prevent inflammation. After peeling these parts, you can chop or grate them, add them to soups, dishes and baby food. Of course, if you like raw vegetables, it’s also possible to peel and eat crunchy.

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15. PINEAPPLE BELLY

Instead of peeled and belly-removed pineapples from the grocery store, take the whole pineapple and chop the fruit yourself. And don’t throw the middle in the trash. You can chop this part, which is a Bromelain store, and add it to a fruit salad or smoothie. You can chop and freeze this part in cubes, add it to the teapot or pitcher when making tea. You can chop it small and sauté it in olive oil, add it in yogurt and make a nice fruit yogurt.

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16. CARROT ROOTS

Instead of trashing the roots of carrots, you can eat the rest of the carrots as you eat them. But the taste will be a little more astringent. For this reason, it may make more sense to use these parts in soups or when making vegetable juice.

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17. ONION SHELLS

The onion’s skin is filled with quercetin, which lowers blood pressure and promotes heart health. The quercetin ratio in the shells of red onions is even higher. When making soup or vegetables and broth, you can throw the onions into the pot with their shells and remove the shells while eating after cooking.

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18. CELERY LEAVES

The leaves are as valuable as the root and stems of celery. These leaves, which are magnesium, calcium and vitamin C, can be added to salads and used when making vegetable broth or soup. It will add both flavor and health to your dishes.

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19. CHARD STEMS

The stems of the biceps are as valuable as the leaves, they contain the substance glutamine, which strengthens your immune system. It is also a large repository of iron and fiber. You can lightly oil the stems and cook them in the oven at 180 degrees with a little salt. First cover it with foil and cook for 10 minutes, then remove the foil and continue cooking for another 20 minutes.

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20. KIWI BARK

The bark of Kiwi is also a richer store of vitamin C and fiber than its fruit, as in lemon or orange. You can eat it with a Kiwi peach-like crust. But if you don’t like it because it’s a little prickly, then try adding it to smoothies with its shell.

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21. BEET LEAVES

We usually eat the root of beets, but the leaves are also a store of vitamin A, C and K. You can cook it just like spinach or chard. You’ll love its slightly sweet flavor and pinkish color.

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22. PARSLEY STALKS

Do you just use the leaves of parsley and throw away the stems? Don’t throw it away, it’s a huge mistake. Because the stems of parsley are as useful as the leaves. You can also finely chop them and use them in salads and dishes.

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23. MUSHROOM ROOTS

When using mushrooms in food, you can use not only their Hills, but also their roots. Its flavor and texture will not be different from the rest of the mushroom. Especially for recipes where you finely chop mushrooms, such as soup or sauté, mushroom roots can be very suitable.

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24. BANANA PEELS

A Turkish banana is a fruit filled with tryptophan, a substance that increases the secretion of serotonin, also known as the happiness hormone. Its bark is as valuable as its fruit. Especially since the shells of ripe Turkey Alanya bananas are softer and thinner, they work more. Boil these shells in water for 10 minutes or so and add them to smoothies or soups, mash them and add them to your cake batters. Drinking the boiled water of bananas also makes it easier to fall asleep. You can also eat bananas by slicing them with their shells and baking them in the oven.
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President of Organ Transplant Center at MedicalPark Hospital Antalya

Turkey's world-renowned organ transplant specialist. Dr. Demirbaş has 104 international publications and 102 national publications.

Physician's Resume:

Born on August 7, 1963 in Çorum, Prof. Dr. Alper Demirbaş has been continuing his work as the President of MedicalPark Antalya Hospital Organ Transplantation Center since 2008.

Prof. who performed the first tissue incompatible kidney transplant in Turkey, the first blood type incompatible kidney transplant, the first kidney-pancreas transplant program and the first cadaveric donor and live donor liver transplant in Antalya. Dr. As of August 2016, Alper Demirbaş has performed 4900 kidney transplants, 500 liver transplants and 95 pancreas transplants.

In addition to being the chairman of 6 national congresses, he has also been an invited speaker at 12 international and 65 national scientific congresses. Dr. Alper Demirbaş was married and the father of 1 girl and 1 boy.

Awards:

Eczacibasi Medical Award of 2002, Akdeniz University Service Award of 2005, Izder Medical Man of the Year Award of 2006, BÖHAK Medical Man of the Year Award of 2007, Sabah Mediterranean Newspaper Scientist of the Year Award of 2007, ANTIKAD Scientist of the Year Award of 2009, Social Ethics Association Award of 2010, Işık University Medical Man of the Year Award of 2015, VTV Antalya's Brand Value Award of 2015.

Certificates:

Doctor of Medicine Degree Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine Ankara, General Surgeon Ministry of Health Turkey EKFMG (0-477-343-8), University of Miami School of Medicine Member of Multiple Organ Transplant, ASTS Multiorgan Transplant Scholarship. Lecturer at Kyoto University. Lecturer at University of Essen, Research assistant at the University of Cambridge .

Professional Members:

American Society of Transplant Surgeons, American Transplantation Society Nominated, Middle East and Southern Africa Council Transplantation Society 2007, International Liver Transplantation Association, Turkish Transplantation Association, Turkish Society of Surgery, Turkish Hepatobiliary Surgery Association.

Disclaimer:

Our website contents consist of articles approved by our Web and Medical Editorial Board with the contributions of our physicians. Our contents are prepared only for informational purposes for public benefit. Be sure to consult your doctor for diagnosis and treatment.
Medically Reviewed by Professor Doctor Alper Demirbaş
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